The Cup Champion’s Beer Glass

Anyone who has read my posts knows I live just outside Charlotte, North Carolina. Home of NASCAR. Sure, the official headquarters is in Daytona. But the NASCAR Hall of Fame is in Charlotte, adjacent to a large building with NASCAR’s logo on it. Almost all of the teams’ race shops are within 20 miles of Charlotte, and if you extend 90 miles, I believe all but one race shop is within radius. More on this introduction later…

If you have read some of my other posts, you have probably figured out I have an equipment addiction in terms of bodies and lenses. I have a couple of the baddest a-mount prime lenses on the planet. The 85mm f/1.4 Zeiss Alpha. The Minolta 200mm f/2.8 High Speed APO G. The 135mm Smooth Transmission Focus. I figure there are about 4-5 lenses I would want more than the ones I have and most of them are way out of my price range. I’d love the Minolta 600mm f/4 High Speed APO G. I can’t spend that kind of dough without spousal approval. They typically go for $5000-6000. The 300mm f/2.8 SSM G-II looks pretty awesome. $7000 is more than I paid for my truck, a 1998 Dodge Ram 1500 with 14,000 miles on it in 2006. The Sony 500mm f/4 runs about $12 grand. So I have to shop around. A Minolta 300mm f/2.8 APO G is about $4000 less than the current Sony model. I’m intrigued by the Minolta 400mm f/4.5.

I was doing some value shopping and I came across a Minolta 300mm f/4 High Speed APO G for less than what I paid for the 200mm f/2.8. I wasn’t sure about spending that kind of dough on a dark f/4 lens. I figured I’d buy it and if I don’t like it, I’ll sell it to raise money for a 300mm f/2.8.

One of my favorite things about being on the A-mount is the cool nicknames old Minolta lenses have. I used to own the Minolta Beercan, the 70-210 f/4 lens which is the about the same size of a Coors tallboy. There’s the “Big Beercan” (75-300 f/4.5-5.6), the “Baby Beercan” (35-70 f/4), and the “Secret Handshake” (28-135 f/4-4.5). Anyway, I was surprised about how small the 200mm f/2.8 High Speed APO G was. The lens arrived yesterday and I pulled it out of the box…

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I am completely overwhelmed by how big this thing is.

Yeah, that is the fully extended 85mm f/1.4 ZA on the bottom with a filter and a lens cap, with the fully hooded 200mm f/2.8 HS APO G on top on the right. The 300mm f/4 HS APO G is on the left.

I think the 300mm f/4 High Speed APO G lens should be named the Champion’s Beer Glass. Why? Last year, the NASCAR Sprint Cup Champion Brad Keselowski created a buzz on social media about the giant beer glass he was drinking out of when he won the championship. I can’t post a photo, but go to Bing and look it up. Or click here…

Long story short, that beer glass was insane! And so is this thing. I guess I should have read the specification. The 200mm is 134mm long according to spec measured lens bayonet to front element. My quick “I think I remember a ruler having 30 centimeters” math tells me it is about 5-6 inches long depending on if the hood is extended or not. The 300mm lens spec says 220mm or 8 inches long. The front element sinks in a bit and the hood is about 4 inches long. With the rear cap, and hooded this bad boy is a foot long.

How does it shoot? Well I have shot maybe 20 frames with this and I already can tell this lens is not likely to leave my collection any time soon. Wide open, this thing is razor sharp. And the famous Minolta color. Straight off the body, zero editing.

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SLT-A99V, 300mm f/4 HS APO G@ f/4, ISO 500, 1/320s

Here is the same shot, on the left side of the frame.

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A little bit of CA there, but not much. The biggest thing (other than physical length and weight) I need to get used to is the big minimum focus distance. 250cm. A little over eight feet.

Dogwood berries are my standard of red. This thing knocks it out of the park.

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SLT-A99V, Minolta 300mm f/4 High Speed APO G@f/4, ISO 640, 1/320s

And full resolution. Keep in mind, these are ISO 640. The leaf was peaking in manual focus and I am handheld.

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A little bit of green under one of the berries. Fixable.

So there you have it. And I think I just figured out my PG-13 nickname for this thing. The Big Ass Beer Glass.

One year later…

Today, WordPress let me know I have been doing this for a year. A year and a week, actually by my count. I hadn’t logged in for a while as I am absolutely slammed with work right now. Now I feel bad. I really want to be able to post a little more frequently than I do. I’m still two months behind on posting about my Austria trip. I’ve had 16,000 unique page views. Hopefully some of those people got some value from my posts.

In my first couple of posts I mentioned something about not being able to shoot my favorite subject, my wife. Now I get to photograph her more often. One problem solved.

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SLT-A99V, 85mm f/1.4 ZA @ f/1.4, ISO 100, 1/640s

A year ago I was shooting with my A77, and though I still have it, use it, and love it; I now shoot mostly with my A99. I’ve learned some new techniques and figured a couple of things out.

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SLT-A99V, 24mm f/2 SSM ZA @ f/5.6, ISO 100, Various speeds (Processed in HDR Efex Pro 2 from 3 exposures)

I’ve made a couple of friends, and even hung out with one. Thousands of miles away from home, on a different continent.

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SLT-A99V, Minolta 28-75 f/2.8@f/3.2 , ISO 50, 1/640s

Which I want to make sure and add as a side note, I have met people online from near my own town through this blog and not made it work to go shoot with them. I feel bad about that.

I’ve slowly started a business. And though it will be a while before I turn a profit (and I have to stop my little lens addiction), I have gotten to shoot some things I didn’t think I would get a chance to shoot before.

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SLT-A99V, 135mm f/2.8[T4.5] STF, ISO 800, 1/125s

This little blog has done a ton for me. I’ll try to return the favor if I can. Hopefully a little more often.

Until then, I’ll do the best I can to post what I have learned. Even though I am living the dream, I really owe it to my few readers to be a little more diligent.

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SLT-A99V, 24mm f/2 SSM ZA @ f/3.2, ISO 2500, 1/60s

(Talk about living the dream Smile  )

Catch Up Post (Series 2, Number 5, Part 2: My trip to Austria: Lessons)

OK, as promised a while back, almost two months ago, more Austria. Probably my biggest weakness as a human being (other than being months late with my posts) is my ability to accept help and criticism, and seek advice. In going to Austria, I faced this weakness in learning from Christian and every time I resisted I was taken to school. I learned a lot more than the lessons I will list below, these are probably the no-brainers.

I had two bodies (A77/A99) and one to four lenses (24/2, 50/2.8, 85/1.4, 135/2.8 STF) with me at most times and my Lumia 1020. One day I got sick of carrying all of the weight and against Christian’s advice I brought only the A99 and 135 STF one day and regretted the decision all day.

Lesson #1: Bring something wide. Just do it. Wide angle shots aren’t always about fitting everything in.

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SLT-A99V, 24mm f/2 SSM ZA @ f/2, ISO 100, 1/160s

This is a 100% off the body jpg from a lake at a magical place called Styria. I was using manual focus wide open and peaking on the tree growing on the stump.

Christian shoots with an A57 and an array of various lenses. I’d venture to say 50% of his shots were between 14mm and 28mm regardless of lens. He has a couple of wide angle techniques I hadn’t tried before. I have a feeling I’ll be including the techniques in my bag of tricks from now on. I’d also say he shoots ISO 200 about half the time or more. I normally use Auto ISO on my A99 at 100-800 or 100-1600 but I found 200 to a good place for consistent quality in following Christian’s advice one day.

Lesson #2: ISO 200 is a good place to be.

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SLT-A99V, 85mm f/1.4 ZA @ f/1.4, ISO 200, 1/5000s

This was shot in Vienna on my last full day. I felt like I needed a “redo” of some of the spots after not bringing the right equipment.

I have attempted Macro shots before but I typically tried to ensure the sunlight was present to raise my shutter speed. Christian would rush to give me some shade, which made no sense to me at the time. Now it makes perfect sense. He also showed me a technique for handheld macro in manual. Put the body in rapid fire mode and move outward.

Lessons #3 & 4: Sunlight doesn’t always make sense for Macro. Use a Continuous Shooting mode to shoot Macro handheld.

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SLT-A77V, Minolta 50mm f/2.8 Macro @ f/6.3, ISO 100, 1/250s

This is a flower in Christian’s front yard. He shaded the shot for me using a car windshield shade.

I’ve never used Macro tubes. Christian had a neat little set of tubes. Amazing results with my existing lenses. It was amazing to see how those worked. The 85mm f/1.4 ZA lens was really good to work with in that situation. The Minolta 200mm f/2.8 APO G was OK.

Lesson #5: Macro tubes are effective and not expensive.

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SLT-A99V, 85mm f/1.4 ZA @ f/6.3 (with Kenko Macro tubes), ISO 500, 1/100s

Another flower in Christian’s front yard. I almost fell backward after this shot, the bee was huge in the viewfinder.

These are 5 of many lessons I learned in Austria. I will have one more Austria post to wrap these up but I have some other catching up to do…